hip and back pain

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  • #9347
    karanza85
    Participant

    Does anyone pre or post Botox procedure suffer from hip and low back pain? My pelvic PT thinks it’s all interrelated. Thoughts?

    #13954
    mmHeather34
    Moderator

    Hi Karanza. I suffered with primary vaginismus for several years and had the Botox treatment program in 2011 and was then able to have intercourse. While I have never experienced lower back or hip pain either pre or post-procedure, this is a good question. I found an article that I wanted to share:

    http://www.bodystressrelease.co.uk/index.php/body-stress-release/bsr-for-vulvodynia-vaginismus-vistibulodynia

    Excerpts include:

    “Body Stress Release practitioners have worked with many women suffering from vulvodynia / vestibulodynia / vaginismus and other related conditions. The majority of them have achieved significant relief from their pain and discomfort, which in some cases, they had been experiencing for many years.

    BSR practitioners have noticed in some women that there is a common link between a previous back and/or coccyx injury and the subsequent onset of vulval pain. We have found that releasing tension in the lower back, sacrum, coccyx and pelvic areas encourages the vulval and pelvic floor muscles to relax, which in turn leads to a reduction in pain.

    A significant proportion of the women we have seen also reported other symptoms of stored stress including IBS, indigestion, constipation, recurring urinary infections and cramps, all of which have improved with Body Stress Release.

    Some examples of past injuries sustained include falling down stairs, falling off a horse, slipping on ice, and skiing and sporting accidents. A few women have also developed vulval pain or vaginismus following surgery. For some women, a substantial period of time elapsed between injury and the onset of vulval pain or tightness when their bodies reached a state of stress overload. A high percentage of women were originally diagnosed and treated for either cystitis or thrush.

    The pudendal nerve is the motor nerve originating from the sacrum carrying signals to and from the urethra, genitals and the anal area. Tight or painful muscles that originate in the middle and lower back also insert into the pelvic area and may exert pressure on these nerve pathways. Tension in any of these areas may result in a burning feeling, loss of sensation, numbness, tightness, a stabbing, knife-like or aching pain.”

    I would love to hear thoughts from others here as well.

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