Treatment for sexual dysfunction varies depending upon individual sexual and medical history, as well as the different manifestations of the problem a patient experiences. Furthermore, the conditions related to sexual dysfunction in women may often overlap, as the following stories demonstrate.

This first story, as well as all of those available through the links below, are real words from real Maze patients, each of whom came to us with her own physical, medical and emotional situation that contributed to her particular problem with sexual function.

Going to Maze was one of the most important gifts I ever gave myself.

I went to Maze because I had never experienced penetration and had enormous anxieties about intercourse, my body and my attractiveness as a woman. Gynecological exams were painful and I was terrified of having a sexual relationship. I was even too scared to make the first appointment. I had heard about Maze from my doctor and it took me months to gather the courage to call them. It was the best thing I could have ever done for myself.

The appointment began with a consultation with the clinical director. I then started with physical treatment to help me get past the pain. The staff worked with me patiently and respectfully at my own pace. I never felt rushed, just always encouraged. They brought me farther on this journey than I ever believed could happen. I am so much healthier now, emotionally and physically, that I can never thank the staff enough. The improvement in my sex life seems to reflect in every aspect of my life.

Going to Maze was one of the most important “gifts” I ever gave myself. I will always be grateful for the care that I received there – for the genuine caring and professionalism of the therapists and nurses. The staff and treatment literally changed my life in a way I could never expect.

– A, Age 48 –



Painful intercourse — persistent or recurrent genital pain that occurs just before, during or after sex — may occur for a variety of reasons ranging from anatomical problems to psychological concerns. It is not uncommon for women to experience pain during intercourse at some point in their lives, but treatments that focus on the underlying causes can help eliminate or reduce this common problem. We’ve helped hundreds of women no different than you take the pain out of painful sex. Read some of their stories here.


Vaginismus is a condition where there is involuntary tightness of the vagina during attempted intercourse. The tightness is actually caused by involuntary contractions of the pelvic floor muscles surrounding the vagina. The woman does not directly control or ‘will’ the tightness to occur; it is an involuntary pelvic response. She may not even have any awareness that the muscle response is causing the tightness or penetration problem. It is believed that 6 -12% of women have vaginismus. Because gathering reliable statistics for vaginismus is hindered by many factors, and the actual number might be quite higher. Regardless, Maze has helped many women overcome this condition. Read about their experiences here.


Many of us are familiar with the use of botulinum toxin as a treatment for cosmetic reasons; it relaxes the muscles in the face so that smile lines and deep wrinkles do not appear. But it is the very action of releasing muscle tension that has led to its success for use in treating vaginismus. The botulinum toxin injections are administered to the muscles in the vagina which makes the muscles unable to tighten. What has been observed in research on the use of botulinum toxin for vaginismus is that there is a very high (75%) rate of success (meaning pain-free intercourse) within two-to-six weeks of the treatment. This reflects the success rates at Maze; stories which you can read about here.


Vulvodynia is a condition of chronic vulvar pain of at least 3 months duration. The vulvar region includes the pad of mons pubis — the fatty tissue at the base of your abdomen, the labia, the clitoris and the vaginal opening. The location, constancy and severity of the pain vary among sufferers. There is a great deal of frustration and anxiety, and she can experience a sense of sadness and loss that her life has become more limited and focused on this medical condition. Vulvodynia effects the woman, her sense of herself as a human being and often the long term health of her relationships. We want to be there to help with all facets of the problem. We have for many women. Read some of their stories here.


Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder (HSDD), is a deficiency or absence of sexual fantasies and desire for sexual activity. It is the diagnostic term for what we commonly know as low desire or low libido or just plain “not wanting to have sex”. There is so much press around HSDD as physicians, sexual health specialists, sex therapists and pharmaceutical companies debate the balance between physiological and psychological sources of low desire. We strongly advocate for an integrated approach to addressing women’s sexual desire and believe that there is no “magic bullet.” But we know that a practical application of physiological testing and treatment in tandem with the psychosexual assessment, diagnosis and counseling work best. Read some of our success stories.


We’ve seen a clear link between raising low hormone levels and strengthening a woman’s libido, her ability to become aroused, and the quality of her orgasms. Women for whom low hormones play a significant role in their dysfunction can benefit greatly from hormone therapy and may have a hard time being helped without them. As with any therapy or treatment, there are both benefits and risks. Our team will take the time to explain each of them to you thoroughly. Should you decide to proceed, we’ll then monitor you on an ongoing basis to make sure the levels are comfortable and effective for your individual case, and that you’re not having any side effects. For many women, hormones are the base for your sex life and without them, nothing else may seem to be working. Hear from some of those who we’ve helped.


“Orgasm” is the word used to describe the intense sensation experienced at the peak of sexual excitement. Most women (hovering somewhere around 96%) can have orgasms. There is a direct correlation between ability to experience orgasm and sexual satisfaction (as most women who have them will generally assure you.) The corollary, that the inability to achieve orgasm lowers a woman’s level sexual satisfaction, is also true. Only 30% of women achieve orgasm through intercourse. If you fall into this category, you need to realize that you are not anorgasmic, merely typical, and there are many alternatives for you. Generally a combination and variation of methods allow couples to have intercourse and also allows the woman to have the release of an orgasm. Read some of our success stories here.


Maze Women’s Sexual Health can help patients who live too far away to see us on a regular basis. While we cannot diagnose or treat medical conditions over the phone, we do have three helpful programs for people who contact us from out of our local area. Hear from one of our long distance patients.